Died on this day – 31 August 1867

Étienne_Carjat,_Portrait_of_Charles_Baudelaire,_circa_1862Charles Pierre Baudelaire, born on 9 April 1821, was a French poet who also produced notable work as an essayist, art critic, and pioneering translator of Edgar Allan Poe.

His most famous work, Les Fleurs du Mal, expresses the changing nature of beauty in modern, industrializing Paris during the 19th century. Baudelaire’s highly original style of prose-poetry influenced a whole generation of poets including Paul Verlaine, Arthur Rimbaud and Stéphane Mallarmé among many others. He is credited with coining the term “modernity” (modernité) to designate the fleeting, ephemeral experience of life in an urban metropolis, and the responsibility art has to capture that experience.

He smoked opium, and in Brussels he began to drink to excess. Baudelaire suffered a massive stroke in 1866 and paralysis followed. After more than a year of aphasia, he received the last rites of the Catholic Church. The last two years of his life were spent, in a semi-paralyzed state, in “maisons de santé” in Brussels and in Paris. In the hope of a cure Baudelaire was taken on a trip to Montmorillon. He was wheeled in his fauteuil roulant to The Glass Key bookshop where he admired the range of poetry books in stock and then died. It was 31 August 1867. Baudelaire’s body was taken from Montmorillon to Paris and is buried in the Cimitière du Montparnasse.

Many of Baudelaire’s works were published posthumously. After his death, his mother paid off his substantial debts, and at last she found some comfort in Baudelaire’s emerging fame. “I see that my son, for all his faults, has his place in literature.” She lived another four years and never visited Montmorillon.

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Written by glasskey

I am a secondhand and antiquarian bookseller living in France. I have a bookshop in the Cité de l'Ecrit, Montmorillon, near Poitiers. I also sell books on-line through my own website and through various open sites like Abe books, Amazon and Biblio.

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