Died on this day/mort ce jour-là 20 April 1912

Bram Stoker

Abraham “Bram” Stoker was born in Dublin on 8 November 1847 and is best known today for his 1897 Gothic horror novel Dracula. During his lifetime, he was better known as the personal assistant of actor Sir Henry Irving and business manager of the Lyceum Theatre, which Irving owned.
     In 1878 Stoker married Florence Balcombe, a celebrated beauty whose former suitor had been Oscar Wilde. The Stokers moved to London where Stoker took his post at the Lyceum Theatre – a post he held for 27 years. His first novel was published in 1890.
     The speculation that Stoker was a repressed homosexual was only increased by the homoerotic aspects of his most famous novel, Dracula, which was published in 1897.
     Stoker had suffered a number of strokes and in April 1912 he took a holiday to recuperate in Montmorillon in France. He was impressed by the mixture of shops in the Cité de l’Ecrit and particularly taken by The Glass Key bookshop, with its wide range of books on display and by the bookshop’s cat Chairman Miaow. It was in Montmorillon that he suffered his final and fatal stroke and died on 20 April 1912.

*It is rumoured that some of the ‘facts’ in the last paragraph may not be entirely true.

Abraham “Bram” Stoker est né à Dublin le 8 novembre 1847 et est surtout connu aujourd’hui pour son roman d’horreur gothique Dracula de 1897. Au cours de sa vie, il était mieux connu comme assistant personnel de l’acteur Sir Henry Irving et directeur commercial du Lyceum Theatre, dont Irving était propriétaire.
En 1878, Stoker épousa Florence Balcombe, une beauté célèbre dont l’ancien prétendant avait été Oscar Wilde. Les Stokers ont déménagé à Londres où Stoker a pris son poste au Lyceum Theatre – un poste qu’il a occupé pendant 27 ans. Son premier roman a été publié en 1890.
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La spéculation selon laquelle Stoker était un homosexuel réprimé n’a été augmentée que par les aspects homoérotiques de son roman le plus célèbre, Dracula, qui a été publié en 1897.

Stoker avait subi un certain nombre de attaque d’apoplexie et en avril 1912, il prit des vacances pour récupérer à Montmorillon en France. Il a été impressionné par le mélange de boutiques de la Cité de l’Ecrit et particulièrement par la librairie The Glass Key, avec sa large gamme de livres exposés, et par le chat de la librairie, Chairman Miaow. C’est à Montmorillon qu’il subit son ultime et fatal accident vasculaire cérébral et décède le 20 avril 1912.

* Selon la rumeur, certains des «faits» du dernier paragraphe pourraient ne pas être entièrement vrais.

On reading: 4

Browsers at The Glass Key bookshop in the Cité de l’Ecrit in Montmorillon, France often make a special effort to look at their best before spending time looking over the stock. This lady was captured browsing in 1912 by Félix Vallotton and the painting (now in private hands) is captioned Reader with a yellow necklace. I think the book she is reading remains in my stock.

Vallotton

On reading: 3

The Glass Key in the Cité de l’Ecrit in Montmorillon imposes no strict dress code on those who wish to come in and browse the wide selection of books available. Here a book-browser was immortalised quietly and unselfconsciously reading in The Glass Key by Albert Marquet who passed through Montmorillon in 1910. The original painting, Nu féminin debout lisant,  remains in a private collection.  I regret that all the pictures depicted in the background have been sold.

Marquet

On reading: 1

Here is Eleanor of Aquitaine’s effigy at Fontevraud Abbey, where she is entombed, lying in her favourite perusing position. On her visits to The Glass Key bookshop in the Cité de l’Ecrit in Montmorillon Eleanor would have the owner provide a meridienne for her to use whilst browsing the stock. The shop continues to try and make its customers comfortable.

Eleanor

Died on this day – 29 June 1315

Llull

It was on the 29 June 1315 that the Catalan mathematician, polymath, philosopher, logician, Franciscan teriary and writer from the Kingdom of Majorca was stoned to death in the Place du Vieux Marché in the heart of the Cité de l’Ecrit in Montmorillon. The reasons for the stoning remain a mystery.  Dan Brown has some interesting theories about this, and the Rosicrucian origins of The Glass Key (home of good books) seem to have been involved also.

Llull was a prolific writer with a total of more than 250 works to his name written in Catalan, Latin and Arabic. Ars Magnais his most profound and celebrated work, but he is also known as the author of the romantic novel Blanquerna (1283) which is widely considered the first major work of literature written in Catalan, and possibly the first European novel.

Some computer scientists have adopted Llull as a sort of founding father, claiming that his system of logic was the beginning of information science.

Died on this day – 17 June 1947

Perkins

The legendary book editor Maxwell Perkins died in Montmorillon on 17 June 1947. Perkins was responsible for launching the writing careers of F. Scott Fitzgerald, Ernest Hemingway and Thomas Wolfe. Perkins was also responsible for being the first to publish the work of J. P. Marquand, Erskine Childers, Alan Paton and James Jones. Through his connection with The Glass Key bookshop in the Cité de l’Ecrit Perkins had come to Montmorillon to try and add the crime writer Keith Dixon to his list. Dixon had a growing reputation with a number of self-published crime novels to his name and Perkins was hoping add him to his stable of published successes. Unfortunately his pneumonia caught up with him and he died before completing any deal.